Forncett Steam Museum Pipe Appeal

The Forncett Industrial Steam Museum, established in 1981 by Dr Rowan Francis, tells the story of the development of steam power in Great Britain from 1698 to the present day. 18 full-sized engines spanning the industrial revolution have been rescued and restored to working order on the site. They are demonstrated to the public on steam days including one of the steam engines that was used to open Tower Bridge in London. Based in southern Norfolk, this small, independent, volunteer-run museum became a Charitable Incorporated Organisation in 2018.

A boiler inspection in June 2021 concluded that the whole pipeline system would have to be replaced with mill certified seamless steam pipe and certified wrought iron fittings and valves, in order to obtain renewed public liability insurance. Consequently, the museum volunteers have had to strip out the entire pipe system from boiler to each engine for replacement with new piping.

Not only does this mean that the museum will not be in full steam until May 2022, but the museum also needs to raise the £14,000 it will cost to replace the old pipework with the new material. The museum has set up on online appeal, with the aim of getting the engines back in steam for next spring. To donate follow this link: https://www.forncettsteammuseum.co.uk/

The Hopwas Beam Engine ‘Spruce’, installed at the Tamworth Pumping Station in 1879

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