Heritage Digital Fundraising Seminar, 30 November 2021

On the 30th November Heritage Digital will be running its latest business support session, a webinar on ‘Developing a fundraising strategy for your heritage organisation’. Digital methods are now the most popular way to give money to charitable causes in the UK, yet conservation, environment, and heritage charities took only 4% of online giving in the UK in 2019, the year before the pandemic hit. 

This free session will specifically benefit those small and mid-sized heritage organisations receiving under £1 million per year in income, and those within heritage organisations responsible for digital/fundraising. The session will provide participants with: 

  • The basic principles of digital fundraising
  • The main methods of effectively fundraising with digital
  • The core elements of a digital fundraising strategy

To read more details and sign up follow this link: https://charitydigital.org.uk/heritage-digital-academy-modules-page/webinar-developing-a-fundraising-strategy-for-your-heritage-organisation?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Heritage%20Digital%20Academy%20aq%2E

Heritage Railways and COVID-19: Getting Back on Track

A new report from Historic England (November 2021) reviews the impact of COVID-19 on heritage railways and some of the valuable lessons learned which are relevant to the rest of the heritage sector.

Heritage railways experienced wide-ranging challenges due to the Covid-19 pandemic in 2020 and 2021. However, some have demonstrated notable resilience in face of these difficulties, benefiting from strategies that they have employed themselves or that have been implemented by the heritage railway sector at large.

The study draws upon primary evidence generated by interviews with seven representatives of heritage railways across England and a set of contextual secondary sources. The report highlights a selection of the approaches adopted during the pandemic in order to support individual railways and the sector as whole, from accessing public funds, fundraising through online donations, and philanthropy, to investment in IT infrastructure, outdoor opportunities and developing flexible revenue streams, effective crisis management, and engaging with supporters and volunteers.

Finally, the study discusses the wider applicability of these approaches across the heritage sector to support better resilience to known and unexpected challenges in the future.

The full report can be downloaded here: https://historicengland.org.uk/research/results/reports/8449/HeritageRailwaysandCovid-19_GettingBackonTrack

Claverton Pumping Station Appeals for Funding Support

Claverton Pumping Station is preparing for more flooding over the coming winter months and is appealing for funds. The volunteer-run museum lies just outside Bath, where a group maintains the Grade I listed pumping station, dating from 1813.

Using a water-wheel, the station pumps 100,000 gallons of water an hour into the Kennet & Avon Canal to keep it topped up from the nearby River Avon. Unfortunately, as the pumping station is built next to the river the site floods on a yearly basis. From October-March, the lowest floor needs to be cleared to minimise any flood damage. With little space in the pumphouse itself the group relies on an outbuilding to store signs, benches, and parts of machines for the winter. The outbuildings are up the bank from the pumphouse, thus getting them away from all but the worst floods. However, their largest outbuilding has all but collapsed. They are looking to raise £2,500 towards helping the group to build a strong raised outbuilding that can survive even the worst floods. This new winter storage will help keep the pumping station preserved for future generations.

Details on how to donate can be found here: https://www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/claverton-pumping-station

Claverton pumping engine.

HTN 2021 Conference: Recovery, Sustainability, Wellbeing

Join the Heritage Trust Network for their 2021 Conference in person as part of the Coventry City of Culture and online, on the 11th, 19th & 20th November 2021. The Heritage Trust Network are a membership organisation for community heritage across the UK and their members come together once a year to discuss their projects. This year the speakers will focus on how sites and organisations can develop their projects and approaches to heritage regeneration whilst thinking about our environmental impact, our people, and our long term survival.

The event will include four elements, an online day of talks, an in-person day of workshops, the annual conference dinner, and a day of tours with site visits. You can join them for any and all parts of the conference. In order to provide a fully engaged experience for all attendees, the online event (11th November) will be 100% online, and the in-person events (19th to 20th November) will be 100% in-person. You will be contacted before the event to select your workshop and tour choices.

There are free tickets for students and apprentices and funded bursaries to help anyone who would find travel/accommodation costs prohibitive, particularly young people, those at the start of their career, changing career and those who are out of work. #HTNConf21

Details on how to book can be found here: https://htnconference.eventbrite.co.uk

‘Snapshot in Time’ Online Conference on Industrial & Transport Heritage

The “Snapshot in Time: photography and industrial heritage” free online conference, 17 November, will discuss the importance of photography as a documentation and advocacy tool for industrial and transport heritage. It is organised by The Scottish Transport and Industry Collections and Knowledge network with speakers from Scotland and England, and beyond.

Topics and speakers include:

  • Photography and Industry – an evolution through time by David Mitchell, Historic Environment Scotland
  • The use of photographs for education, outreach and advocacy by Miriam McDonald, Historic Environment Scotland
  • James O Davies, Historic England
  • Recording Cottam: Photographic recording of coal-fired electricity generation by Ben Russell, Science Museum
  • The Sir William Arrol Collection – iconic photographs on the brink of oblivion by Miles Oglethorpe, Historic Environment Scotland
  • Exploiting photographs within a mixed collection by Carol Morgan, Institute of Civil Engineers
  • D Bruce McCowan, Professional Engineers Ontario

Booking details and a fuller programme can be found here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/snapshot-in-time-photography-and-industrial-heritage-tickets-189836645517

Launch of SPAB Heritage Awards for 2022

The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) is expanding its awards for 2022 from two to five. These five awards will further recognise the communities that care for historic buildings and the experts who repair them.

The existing SPAB awards – the John Betjeman Award for conservation to faith buildings and the Philip Webb Award, a design competition for student architects – will joined by three new ones: the Buildings Craftsperson of the Year, the Sustainable Heritage Award, and the Best Loved Award. Storm Bespoke Secondary Glazing will be the main, headline, sponsor for the expanded SPAB Heritage Awards, whilst Terra Measurement is the Philip Webb Award sponsor.

For details on how to entre follow this link: https://www.spab.org.uk/about-us/awards/award-sponsors

Forncett Industrial Steam Museum Appeal Success

In the summer of 2021 the Forncett Industrial Steam Museum launched an urgent funding appeal. This was for £14,000 to cover the cost of replacing the old steam pipework feeding some of the 18 full-sized steam engines on display, and getting this new system certificated.

The IHN East of England member launched an on-line appeal in June 2021 and this has now (October 2021) reached its target, with support coming from the friends of the museum and various other supporters. These funds will allow the steam pipeline system to be replaced over the winter, giving time for it to be certificated for full steaming in Spring 2022.

Hick Hargreaves engine, manufacture din Bolton, on display the Forncett Industrial Steam Museum.

Levant Mine & Beam Engine Conservation Plan: Consultant Opportunity

The National Trust are looking for a Consultant to write a Conservation Plan for the Levant Mine and Beam Engine, Cornwall. The tin and copper mine is part of the Cornish Mining World Heritage Site. Like its neighbour Botallack, Levant Mine lies dramatically draped over nearly a kilometre of cliff. Established around 1748 from an amalgamation of three earlier mines, it was worked until 1930. The National Trust has been involved with its care since 1967.

The National Trust owns the western third of the mine including the Levant Engine. Cornwall Council owns the rest of the surface remains of the mine. The Engine Houses and Headframes are Grade II Listed structures, as is the Pumping Engine House. The Skip Shaft Headfame is also Grade II listed. The steam winding engine is the world’s oldest Cornish-type beam engine still in its original engine house.

A copy of the brief can be download here:

Queries about the Conservation Management Plan brief can be emailed to: Amanda.Day@nationaltrust.org.uk. The deadline for tender submissions is 31 October 2021.

Historic England Launches Aerial Archaeology Mapping Explorer

Mining spoil heaps in North Yorkshire. Copyright Historic England.

For the first time ever, Historic England has made the results of over 30 years of aerial photograph mapping projects freely available online. The public can use the new research tool to explore heritage from ancient settlements to secret Cold War military installations, or to see the complex archaeological landscapes of Hadrian’s Wall, Stonehenge, and industrial landscapes.

The Aerial Archaeology Mapping Explorer lets you explore the layers of archaeology in and around your local place. You can browse the map and zoom in to the location you’re interested in or search by postcode, address or place name. Follow this link to explore the website: https://historicengland.org.uk/research/results/aerial-archaeology-mapping-explorer/

The map brings together the results of numerous projects undertaken by specialists at Historic England and its predecessor organisations since the late 1980s, as well as many partner organisations.  Hundreds of thousands of aerial photographs, ranging in date from the 1920s to the present, have been studied. More recently, innovative technologies such as lidar – airborne laser scanning – and web-based sources, such as Google Earth, have been added to the sources used. Every site has a simple description with links to the full Historic Environment records held online. For most of the areas there is also a free report detailing the highlights and new discoveries encountered in each project.

The Aerial Archaeology Mapping Explorer, alongside complementary resources such as Historic Environment Records available via Heritage Gateway, offers a springboard to further investigation, whether for research purposes or simply curiosity about the area where you live. It should be especially useful for researching industrial archaeology and heritage sites.

A screen shot of a GIS system displaying archaeological features around Hadrian's Wall mapped by aerial survey methods.

An example of how the aerial photographs and LIDAR data are interpreted on the new Historic England mapping explorer.

Repurposing Historic Mills – New Report

Historic England has published a new report exploring the potential of under-used and vacant mills. It identifies their possible contribution to rebalancing the country’s economy and improving environmental stability, and highlights regeneration success stories since 2017.

Textile mills were the original Northern Powerhouse. From the late 18th century onwards, they drove forward the industrial revolution. They triggered technical innovation, stimulated new trade and transformed the transport network. Silk, cotton, and woollen production shaped the landscape, economy, and communities of Greater Manchester, Lancashire, and Yorkshire. However, with the 20th century decline in national textile manufacturing, many of these monumental and characterful buildings face uncertain futures.

‘Driving Northern growth through repurposing historic mills’ re-assesses the re-use potential of under-used and vacant mills, identifies their possible contribution to rebalancing the country’s economy, and improving environmental sustainability, and highlights regeneration success stories since 2017.

The 2021 report update can be accessed by following this link: https://historicengland.org.uk/images-books/publications/driving-northern-growth-repurposing-mills/

It is based upon a more detailed technical assessment by Cushman & Wakefield.