Museum Re-opening Guidance

A partial re-opening of the heritage sector is now underway in England with the ending of the second lockdown today (2 December 2020). However, industrial heritage sites, along with other cultural and museum venues, remain closed under the revised Tier 3 COVID-19 restrictions.

Re-opening guidance for museums were issued in July 2020 by the National Museum Directors’ Council (NMDC) Planning and Remobilisation Group, with support from the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, and contributions from across the museum sector, including AIM. They are intended for use by museums in England. Separate re-opening guidelines are available for Scottish and Welsh cultural and heritage sites. This is guidance will also be relevant for all industrial heritage sites planning to open early in 2021.

The Association of Independent Museums and the Museum Development Network have produced a checklist to be used in conjunction with the Guidelines, to help museums take a strategic, well informed, approach to making decisions on re-opening and implementing a safe and effective plan in conjunction with the national guidance for museums.

More details here: Museum Reopening Guidance and Checklist – AIM – Association of Independent Museums (aim-museums.co.uk)

Rebuilding Heritage – Latest Free Support Programme Announced

Applications are now open for the next round of free support from the Rebuilding Heritage programme. Rebuilding Heritage is a free support programme, funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund, to help the heritage sector respond to the ongoing impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Heritage organisations and businesses can apply for one-to-one support in business planning, fundraising, and communications and marketing, and for a place on group training in leadership and in managing staff wellbeing.Full details of the support on offer and the application process are available on the Rebuilding Heritage website. The closing date for applications is Wednesday 16 December and decisions on applications from the Rebuilding Heritage team will be confirmed before Christmas. Details here:

Home – Rebuilding Heritage – Free Support Programme for the Heritage Sector

A Village in Lockdown: Understanding the Impact of Covid-19 on Port Sunlight

IHN North West member Port Sunlight Village Trust (PSVT) has received a Covid-19 Emergency Response Fund grant from Historic England to understand and document the impact of Covid-19 on Port Sunlight and to identify ways to mitigate the threats and maximise the opportunities for the village’s heritage and its community.

The main focus of the project is a programme of stakeholder research and engagement that includes the village’s residential community – of tenants, owner-occupiers and landlords – as well as businesses, clubs and societies. PSVT now wishes to commission this important piece of work, which must conclude no later than 1st March 2021. The deadline for tender submission is 10am Thursday 24 September, 2020. For further information and to view the full brief, click here:

A village in lockdown: Understanding the impact of Covid-19 on Port Sunlight

Heritage Open Days 2020 Go Online

The cross-compound horizontal steam engine at Grane Mill, Haslingden, Lancashire, that used to power 11 looms. Open for HOD in 2020.

Each September, Heritage Open Days (HOD) highlights places of historical interest, providing free access or conducted tours to the public. This includes a significant number of industrial heritage sites. This year’s HOD is still going ahead but with many places providing online events, such as the Etruria Industrial Museum in Staffordshire and Stacey Arms drainage mill in Tunstall, Norfolk. For those sites still physically open constraints will be in place as a result of Covid-19.

Many industrial heritage sites not normally open to the public will be accessible, such as Bradwell Windmill in Buckinghamshire; Grane Textile Mill and Marsh Windmill both in Lancashire; Guns Mill in Gloucestershire; Newland Iron Furnace and Warwick Bridge corn mill, both in Cumbria; Stevens Windmill in Cambridgeshire; and Sunny Banks Mills in Leeds. Individual access details, booking directions, and appropriate COVID-19 protocols for each site can be found on the HOD website below.

You can find local places to visit from September 11-20th at https://www.heritageopendays.org.uk/visiting.

Historic England Industrial Webinars

As part of its training programme Historic England is running industrial heritage webinars. The second will take place on 29 July where Shane Gould will consider in greater depth some of the topics and issues being addressed in Historic England’s developing Industrial Heritage Strategy followed by Dr Mike Nevell, Industrial Heritage Support Officer for England, Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust, describing his work which focusses on industrial sites preserved as heritage attractions.

The webinar will be particularly relevant for local authority planning officers, archaeological advisers, conservation officers and consultants/contractors working on industrial heritage sites and those involved in the ownership or management of industrial sites preserved as heritage attractions.

Details on how to sign up can be found here – https://lnkd.in/dyf47Js. – including the recording from the first webinar.

Historic England Launch Second COVID-19 Emergency Fund

Historic England launched on 9th May the ‘Covid-19 Emergency Heritage at Risk Response Fund’. This will award grants to help fund urgent maintenance, repairs, and surveys at some of England’s locally-cherished historic buildings and sites.

The work funded will help heritage sites reopen to the public and thrive again as quickly as possible – subject of course to Covid-19 restrictions. The business generated will help heritage specialists who, according to recent HE research, have been severely affected by the Covid-19 outbreak. This is the second fund launched by Historic England to help the heritage sector recover from the effects of the pandemic, and is a £3 million temporary funding stream. The first emergency fund is now closed to applications.

Grants of up to £25,000 will be offered for urgent minor repairs from problems such as damaged roofs, masonry, and windows, to the hiring of scaffolding to prevent structural collapse, or to commission surveys necessary to inform urgent repairs. The work funded must be started before Saturday 31 October 2020. The application steps are as follows:

  1. Read the HE guidance (link below)
  2. Complete an HE expression of interest (EOI) survey – deadline Sunday 28 June 2020
  3. HE will tell you if your EOI has been successful by Monday 27 July 2020
  4. Submit a full application – deadline Monday 31 August 2020

Application details can be found here: https://historicengland.org.uk/coronavirus/covid-19-HAR-fund/

For further enquiries contact Historic England at emergencyhar@HistoricEngland.org.uk

Historic England Announce £1.8 million in Coronavirus Grants

Historic England have announced £1.8 million in grants for 70 projects to help tackle the impact of Coronavirus on the heritage sector. The grants range from social distancing guidance for archaeologists during digs, to supporting voluntary organisations and craft workers such as stonemasons, to emergency funding for King Henry VIII’s flagship the Mary Rose.

The Covid-19 Emergency Response Fund was set up in April in response to Historic England’s survey of heritage organisations which revealed the adverse impact of Coronavirus on the sector. The grants will help organisations, voluntary groups and self-employed contractors survive the immediate challenges posed by the pandemic, and to prepare for recovery.

Applicants were invited to apply for grants of up to £25,000 to address financial difficulties arising from Coronavirus and for grants of up to £50,000 for projects and activities that reduce risks to heritage by providing information, resources and skills. The fund was over-subscribed, attracting around 300 applications. Applications included innovative ways of engaging visitors and volunteers while historic places are closed and online training for conservation skills. Industrial sites supported include the Grade II listed Old Low Light building on North Shield’s Fish Quay now in use as a heritage and community Centre.

The next strand of Historic England’s Covid-19 grants response is Heritage at Risk emergency funding, in mid-June. This will make use of the important, highly skilled businesses that form a key part of the heritage sector to address the most urgent needs of our historic environment (when current restrictions have been sufficiently relaxed).

Further details here:

https://historicengland.org.uk/…/covid-19-emergency-grants…/

Applicants were invited to apply for grants of up to £25,000 to address financial difficulties arising from Coronavirus and for grants of up to £50,000 for projects and activities that reduce risks to heritage by providing information, resources and skills. The fund was over-subscribed, attracting around 300 applications. Applications included innovative ways of engaging visitors and volunteers while historic places are closed and online training for conservation skills. Industrial sites supported include the Grade II listed Old Low Light building on North Shield’s Fish Quay now in use as a heritage and community Centre.

The next strand of Historic England’s Covid-19 grants response is Heritage at Risk emergency funding, in mid-June. This will make use of the important, highly skilled businesses that form a key part of the heritage sector to address the most urgent needs of our historic environment (when current restrictions have been sufficiently relaxed).

Further details here:

https://historicengland.org.uk/…/covid-19-emergency-grants…/