Historic England Announce £1.8 million in Coronavirus Grants

Historic England have announced £1.8 million in grants for 70 projects to help tackle the impact of Coronavirus on the heritage sector. The grants range from social distancing guidance for archaeologists during digs, to supporting voluntary organisations and craft workers such as stonemasons, to emergency funding for King Henry VIII’s flagship the Mary Rose.

The Covid-19 Emergency Response Fund was set up in April in response to Historic England’s survey of heritage organisations which revealed the adverse impact of Coronavirus on the sector. The grants will help organisations, voluntary groups and self-employed contractors survive the immediate challenges posed by the pandemic, and to prepare for recovery.

Applicants were invited to apply for grants of up to £25,000 to address financial difficulties arising from Coronavirus and for grants of up to £50,000 for projects and activities that reduce risks to heritage by providing information, resources and skills. The fund was over-subscribed, attracting around 300 applications. Applications included innovative ways of engaging visitors and volunteers while historic places are closed and online training for conservation skills. Industrial sites supported include the Grade II listed Old Low Light building on North Shield’s Fish Quay now in use as a heritage and community Centre.

The next strand of Historic England’s Covid-19 grants response is Heritage at Risk emergency funding, in mid-June. This will make use of the important, highly skilled businesses that form a key part of the heritage sector to address the most urgent needs of our historic environment (when current restrictions have been sufficiently relaxed).

Further details here:

https://historicengland.org.uk/…/covid-19-emergency-grants…/

Applicants were invited to apply for grants of up to £25,000 to address financial difficulties arising from Coronavirus and for grants of up to £50,000 for projects and activities that reduce risks to heritage by providing information, resources and skills. The fund was over-subscribed, attracting around 300 applications. Applications included innovative ways of engaging visitors and volunteers while historic places are closed and online training for conservation skills. Industrial sites supported include the Grade II listed Old Low Light building on North Shield’s Fish Quay now in use as a heritage and community Centre.

The next strand of Historic England’s Covid-19 grants response is Heritage at Risk emergency funding, in mid-June. This will make use of the important, highly skilled businesses that form a key part of the heritage sector to address the most urgent needs of our historic environment (when current restrictions have been sufficiently relaxed).

Further details here:

https://historicengland.org.uk/…/covid-19-emergency-grants…/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s